Quick note from Hwange

Quick note from Hwange

  We have just recently had a trip up to the Falls and Hwange and while staying in Main Camp, we managed to get around to see most of the pans in the area that are now operating with their solar units. We were delighted with the amount of water that is available at the moment, and it obviously remains to be seen how the units cope during the intense heat and dry, but at least there is water at…

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Cecil’s Pride Alive and well – News from Wildcru

Cecil’s Pride Alive and well – News from Wildcru

Cecil and the Trans Kalahari Predator Project May 13, 2016 The idiom has it that as time passes water flows under the bridge: David Macdonald observes that as we approach the anniversary of Cecil’s death that proverbial water has been a torrent, but amongst the turbulence of debate and the swell of concern for lion conservation there is good news from Hwange: Cecil’s three lionesses and seven cubs are still alive and well and, together with the surviving pride male,…

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Ostrich – Struthio camelus

Ostrich – Struthio camelus

The flightless ostrich is native to Africa and is the world’s largest bird. Its average lifespan in the wild is 30 to 40 years. It lives in savanna and desert, and weighs up to 155kg. Ostriches are the fastest runners of any 2-legged animal, and can sprint up to 70km/hour. Adult ostriches have a wingspan of about 2 meters; the wings are used in mating displays, to shade the chicks, and to cover the naked skin of the upper legs…

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Waterfowl Count January 2016

Waterfowl Count January 2016

We have just had a phenomenal birding trip up to Hwange for a week, mainly to conduct the African Waterfowl Census which is carried out each January and July. During our time in the park, we managed to record 222 bird species! It is a wonderful time to study the migrant birds in the park, particularly the various raptors. We saw countless European rollers but the other rollers were out in numbers too as were the bee eaters, with plenty…

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